DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

  A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.   Two years ago, researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine analyzed data on 31 cancer types, finding that the number of stem cell divisions within a tissue—over a lifetime—could partly explain…

Rate this:

How insulin and glucagon work to regulate blood sugar levels

  The pancreas secretes insulin and glucagon, both of which play a vital role in regulating blood sugar levels. The two hormones work in balance. If the level of one hormone is outside the ideal range, blood sugar levels may spike or drop. Together, insulin and glucagon help keep conditions inside the body steady. When…

Rate this:

The ultimate couples workout

Partners who train together stay together, apparently. So here’s how to do it…   It’s a hackneyed saying, but studies insist it’s true: couples who train together, stay together.   For many of us, hitting the gym is a solo pursuit – squeezing in some exercise before or after work.   Some who struggle to…

Rate this:

Benefits of Swimming: 10 Reasons Every Woman Should Get in the Water

Swimming can make over your muscles, transform you into a cardio goddess, and turn back the aging clock. Need more reason to suit up? We’ve got ’em right here. Dive in. Benefits of Swimming: It Counts as Both Cardio and Strength Training In swimming, if you aren’t moving constantly, you’re sinking. (Forced cardio!) Plus, water…

Rate this:

Study reveals link between hypertension and brain changes in rats

New rat study offers insights into what may cause hypertension. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, occurs when the force with which blood flows through our veins is consistently too high. Blood pressure (BP) is measured across two parameters – systolic and diastolic. The systolic measure is the top number in a BP measurement….

Rate this:

Things That you Have to Count, But not Calories!

  In the desire for a slender line many fall into the trap – counting calories. But what really should not count the number of calories in food or the numbers on the scale, but something quite different. So, move away from the scale, there are far more important mathematics needs to do on a…

Rate this:

Breakthrough: Scientists create mouse embryo

Because stem cells have the ability to transform into many different types of cells during the body’s early development, embryonic stem cell research offers unique insights into how an organism grows from a single cell. For the first time, scientists have now been able to create a mouse embryo entirely artificially. [Stem cell-modelled embryo ]Researchers…

Rate this:

Bacteria’s amyloids display surprising structure

Protein clumps in S. aureus differ from those in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s   Clusters of a toxic bacterial protein have a surprising structure, differing from similar clumps associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in humans, scientists report in the Feb. 24 Science.   These clusters, called amyloids, are defined in part by their structure: straight regions of…

Rate this:

Research: Biomaterials that mimic bone marrow can alter blood cell development

  Researchers at the University of Illinois report they can alter blood cell development through the use of biomaterials designed to mimic characteristics of the bone marrow.   The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, are a first step toward developing more effective bone marrow treatments for diseases like leukemia and lymphoma.   Blood…

Rate this:

Questions remain about the benefits of taking testosterone

Graph of results after 12 month treatment with testosterone gel Five new studies say hormone replacement is a mixed bag for aging men As a treatment for the ailments of aging, testosterone’s benefits are hit or miss. For men with low testosterone, the hormone therapy is helpful for some health problems, but not so much…

Rate this:

Study: Neurotransmitter Dopamine Plays Role in Human Bonding

  “Animal studies have shown the role of dopamine in bonding but this was the first scientific evidence that it is involved in human bonding,” said Northeastern University Professor Lisa Feldman Barrett, corresponding author of the study.   “That suggests that other animal research in this area could be directly applied to humans as well.”…

Rate this:

Whiplash: How to Reduce the Pain With Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine

  Whiplash is a neck injury that occurs due to a sudden forceful change in motion causing unrestrained whip-like movement of the head and neck. It causes inflammation and damage to the soft tissue of the neck and upper back but can affect the middle and lower back. It leads to a constant sharp, stabbing…

Rate this:

Multiple sclerosis: Stem cell transplantation may halt disease progression

  New research provides further evidence of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis, after finding the procedure halted disease progression for 5 years in almost half of patients.   New research reveals that almost half of MS patients treated with AHSCT experienced no disease progression in the subsequent 5…

Rate this:

WHAT IS HEPATITIS C?

  Hepatitis C is a serious and often-silent liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus. It is one of five main types of hepatitis (the other four are hepatitis A, B, and the less-common D and E). Hepatitis C is transmitted when an infected person’s blood enters a healthy person’s bloodstream, for example, via…

Rate this:

New evidence that vitamin D prevents respiratory infections

  A large-scale meta-analysis using more than 10,000 participants concludes that vitamin D supplementation may help to prevent a major cause of global death – acute respiratory tract infections.   Could vitamin D supplementation prevent acute respiratory tract infections? Acute respiratory tract infections are responsible for 10 percent of ambulance and emergency room visits in…

Rate this:

Ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes have been designed that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don’t elicit scar formation when implanted. These smaller-than-a-capillary-sized probes could provide the reliable brain interface needed to control prosthetics, or follow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. A rendering of the ultra-flexible probe in neural…

Rate this:

Do you have an underactive thyroid?

  Hypothyroidism – or an underactive thyroid – affects one in 70 women and one in 1,000 men according to the NHS. But it can be a tricky disease to diagnose and treat. Dr Michael Mosley, of Trust Me I’m a Doctor, asks if sufferers are slipping through the net.   Someone emailed me the…

Rate this:

MRIs predict which high-risk babies will develop autism as toddlers

  This first-of-its-kind study used MRIs to image the brains of infants, and then researchers used brain measurements and a computer algorithm to accurately predict autism before symptoms set in   Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants with older siblings with autism, researchers from around the country were able to correctly predict 80 percent…

Rate this:

New clinical guideline issued for treating low back pain

Low back pain affects millions of people in the United States, and the condition is one of the most common reasons for people missing work. New guidelines from the American College of Physicians recommend noninvasive ways of treating nonradicular low back pain.   The new treatment recommendations from the American College of Physicians include massage,…

Rate this:

Aspirin increases pregnancy rate in women with inflammation

Infertility affects a large number of couples and individuals who are trying to conceive. New research suggests that a daily low dose of aspirin may increase chances of conception for women with chronic inflammation.   New research suggests that a low dose of aspirin may help women with inflammation to conceive. Infertility – largely defined…

Rate this:

Bacteria ‘sleep’, then rapidly evolve, to survive antibiotic treatments

Biophysicists use quantitative approaches from physics to understand biology The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Using quantitative approaches from physics, biophysicists discovered a surprising way that bacteria can evolve resistance to antibiotics. After evolving a sleeping mechanism, the bacteria can then wake up and evolve resistance 20 times faster than normal — at which point continuing…

Rate this:

How Common Is Magnesium Deficiency—and Could You Have It?

  Magnesium is an important mineral that aids in energy production, the immune system, heart health, and more. But are you getting enough of it through diet alone?   What to know about magnesium deficiency You may not be as familiar with magnesium as you are with better-known minerals such as iron, calcium, and zinc….

Rate this:

Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

In vitro fertilization has transformed reproductive medicine and sparked a number of therapeutic and diagnostic breakthroughs.   Now a new, still experimental, technique known as in vitro gametogenesis (IVG) is poised to usher in the next era in reproductive and regenerative medicine. The approach—thus far successful only in mice—allows scientists to create embryos in a…

Rate this:

Higher Heart Disease Risk for Disadvantaged Women than Men

Women from low socioeconomic strata are 25 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack than disadvantaged men, according to a new study published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. The results highlight the need for tailored interventions for women to address the gender gap and deliver the best possible care.     Researchers…

Rate this:

Sports Help Boost Your Mental Health

Pole Vault Physical activities and sports always ensure sound restful sleep. Since its advent, Islam has always encouraged its believers to exert effort through useful physical activities and sports which are extremely beneficial for our body, as they help us get fit and prevent us from being sick. But in recent times it has also…

Rate this: