How safe are probiotics?

Amid the increasing rise of probiotic use in Western society, a recent journal article asks whether we should evaluate the products’ safety with a little more scrutiny. For millennia, humans have consumed foods rich with live bacteria. Yogurt, for instance, dates back to at least 5000 B.C., and in Korea, kimchi — fermented vegetables — has…

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DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

  A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.   Two years ago, researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine analyzed data on 31 cancer types, finding that the number of stem cell divisions within a tissue—over a lifetime—could partly explain…

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Study: Neurotransmitter Dopamine Plays Role in Human Bonding

  “Animal studies have shown the role of dopamine in bonding but this was the first scientific evidence that it is involved in human bonding,” said Northeastern University Professor Lisa Feldman Barrett, corresponding author of the study.   “That suggests that other animal research in this area could be directly applied to humans as well.”…

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Multiple sclerosis: Stem cell transplantation may halt disease progression

  New research provides further evidence of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis, after finding the procedure halted disease progression for 5 years in almost half of patients.   New research reveals that almost half of MS patients treated with AHSCT experienced no disease progression in the subsequent 5…

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Retroviruses Originated in Ocean 450 Million Years Ago, New Study Says

  Retroviruses (Retroviridae) — a family of viruses that includes pathogens such as HIV, feline leukemia, and several cancer-causing viruses — have an ancient marine origin and originated together with, if not before, their jawed vertebrate hosts nearly 450 million years ago in the Ordovician period, according to a new study published today in the…

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CRISPR gene editing takes on rare immunodeficiency disorder

American Association for the Advancement of Science Researchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells of patients with a rare immunodeficiency disorder; the engineered cells successfully engrafted in mice for up to five months.   Researchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells…

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Pancreatic cancer: Sequencing study challenges thinking on disease progression

Pancreatic cancer is rarely detected in the early stages, as early symptoms are often vague and unrecognized. The result is that by the time diagnosis occurs, the disease is often well advanced, leaving patients with inoperable tumors and very poor prognoses. This tendency for the cancer to appear suddenly has been somewhat of a medical…

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Global Preimplantation genetic diagnosis Market 2016: Industry Growth, Research, Future Outlook to 2022

Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a diagnostic technology used with an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure for the genetic profiling of the embryo prior to implantation in the uterus. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is intended for use in the selection of embryos without genetic disorders, thereby increasing the chances of the successful pregnancy, and for embryonic-sex selection….

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Using Vegetable Oils to Lower Cholesterol May Not Improve Longevity

Does swapping out all of your saturated fat with unsaturated fat lead to a longer life? A new study suggests the answer may be no. Eat less saturated fat for better heart health: that’s been the conventional wisdom based on decades of scientific study. Consumers have been advised to swap saturated (animal) fats — found…

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Therapeutic hypothermia after nonshockable-rhythm cardiac arrest

Therapeutic hypothermia significantly raises the rate of survival with a good neurologic outcome among patients who are comatose after a cardiac arrest with a nonshockable initial rhythm, according to a report published online November 16 in Circulation. Many observational and retrospective cohort studies have examined the possible benefits of therapeutic hypothermia in this patient population,…

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How to kick negative self-talk to the curb

Erica Bartlett has spent most of her adult life saying horrible things to herself. As a heavy teenager, her greatest hits included: “I’m so ugly. No one will ever be attracted to me. I can’t stand to see how big I look in the mirror. I have no willpower around brownies.” DailyBurn: 6 Signs That You’re…

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Indian-origin researcher deveops eye lens that may spell the end of reading glasses

An Indian-origin researcher in the UK is developing an adjustable artificial lens, made from the same material found in smartphone and TV screens, which could improve vision in older people with presbyopia and cataracts. As people age, their lenses lose flexibility and elasticity. This leads to a condition known as presbyopia, common in people over 45 years old,…

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Could brain size predict risk of cognitive impairment?

The research is published in the journal Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy. It focuses specifically on the hippocampi, two “seahorse-looking structures” located in the left and right brain that help form new memories. When these structures are impaired – due to Alzheimer’s disease, for example – it can be difficult to remember things that have happened recently. The…

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Believe it or not! But laziness is wired in us

While you burn calories at the gym or while running in the neighbourhood park, our brain constantly works the opposite, looking for shortest route or choose to sit rather than stand, researchers report. A team from Simon Fraser University in Canada found that our nervous systems are remarkably adept in changing the way we move…

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Meet the 36 Indian Startups Featured at Nasscom’s Startup Konnect

Startup Konnect, held on Sunday by Nasscom in partnership with TiE Silicon Valley and IIM Ahmedabad’s CIIE India, featured 36 startups from India and five startups from US across a variety of sectors such as agriculture, healthcare, energy, financial inclusion, and cleantech. A number of MOUs were signed at the event to strengthen the India…

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Fat hormone augments incilantion towards excercise

Leptin is a fat cell-derived hormone that signals to the brain when the body has enough fuel and energy and is responsible for motivating an individual to exercise more. The satiety hormone leptin is indeed a reality behind the euphoric feeling that gives runners a motivational boost in the middle of their workout, researchers report….

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3D-printed protein complexes models to treat cancer

London: Researchers have created 3D-printed models of protein complexes, vital components in the process of DNA replication, and these could hold the key to future cancer treatment, a study says. When our cells copy their DNA to replicate, it is vital the process runs smoothly, otherwise it can lead to cell death or cancer. To get DNA…

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People with fewer moles may face risk of more aggressive melanoma

While people with more than 50 moles may be at higher risk of developing melanoma, people who have fewer moles may be at greater risk of developing more aggressive melanoma. This is the conclusion of new research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology’s 2015 Summer Academy Meeting in New York, NY. Dr. Caroline C….

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Freezing Airways with Liquid Nitrogen Could Destroy Bronchitis

A technique known as cryotherapy, where liquid nitrogen at nearly minus 200oC is sprayed into the airways to destroy malfunctioning nerves, is being tested in a trial involving several British hospitals, according to a report by The Daily Mail. The new treatment, which is being tested on chronic bronchitis, targets the thickened airway tissue by freezing it. The tissue is first…

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Emotions influence learning and memory, says study

Emotions are not only the product of information-processing by the brain but they also directly influence the processes of learning and memory, says a study. “Different emotions cause the brain to work differently and on distinct frequencies,” said researcher Shlomo Wagner from University of Haifa in Israel. In the first part of the study, the…

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