Man dies from flesh-eating bacteria after swimming with new tattoo

A 31-year-old man died after he reportedly ignored warnings about swimming after getting a new tattoo and contracted a flesh-eating bacteria infection in the Gulf of Mexico. The unidentified man, whose case was detailed in the British Medical Journal, had gotten a tattoo on his right calf five days prior to swimming, Metro reported. The man…

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Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples

A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes – considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that…

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To experience beauty, we need to think

In a recent study, two of Immanuel Kant’s theories on experiencing beauty were assessed. The conclusion is that beauty might be in the eye of the beholder, but the beholder will need to think about it to appreciate it. Beauty is an ephemeral term. Many of us will find beauty in a tropical beach or…

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South African cave yields yet more fossils of a newfound relative

Probing deeper into the South African cave system known as Rising Star, a subterranian maze that last year yielded the largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi. The discovery, announced May 9, 2017 with the publication…

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First public sector stem cell bank to come up at KGMU

In what may come as a relief to over 1 lakh patients of thalassemia in India, a public sector stem cell bank is set to come up at UP’s King George’s Medical University here. A project of the university’s transfusion medicine department, the stem cell bank would roll out stem cell therapy to patients of thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. The proposal is awaiting clearance…

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The exercise pill is here: Burn fat without undergoing fitness training (Video)

For those, who cannot undergo fitness training, ‘exercise pill’ may work as magic for them! A study says, the prospect of an ‘exercise pill’ can be life-changing for people, who don’t work out because of obesity or serious physical disabilities. Hopes for such a pill emerged from scientists who found that an experimental drug allowed mice to run…

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What’s coming next ? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speech

An international collaboration of neuroscientists has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. In the study, publishing on April 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology scientists from Newcastle University, UK, and a neurosurgery group at the University of Iowa, USA, report that they have discovered mechanisms in the…

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European biliary and pancreatic stents market to hit $84 million by 2023

The European pancreatic and biliary stents market, which covers 21 major markets, is set to grow from $60.5 million in 2016 to around $84 million by 2023, representing a compound annual growth rate of 4.8%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. The company’s latest report states that key drivers of the market include increased cancer rates and…

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Toyota shows robotic leg brace to help paralyzed people walk

Toyota is introducing a wearable robotic leg brace designed to help partially paralyzed people walk. The Welwalk WW-1000 system is made up of a motorized mechanical frame that fits on a person’s leg from the knee down. The patients can practice walking wearing the robotic device on a special treadmill that can support their weight. Toyota Motor Corp. demonstrated the equipment…

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DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

  A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.   Two years ago, researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine analyzed data on 31 cancer types, finding that the number of stem cell divisions within a tissue—over a lifetime—could partly explain…

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Breakthrough: Scientists create mouse embryo

Because stem cells have the ability to transform into many different types of cells during the body’s early development, embryonic stem cell research offers unique insights into how an organism grows from a single cell. For the first time, scientists have now been able to create a mouse embryo entirely artificially. [Stem cell-modelled embryo ]Researchers…

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Bacteria’s amyloids display surprising structure

Protein clumps in S. aureus differ from those in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s   Clusters of a toxic bacterial protein have a surprising structure, differing from similar clumps associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in humans, scientists report in the Feb. 24 Science.   These clusters, called amyloids, are defined in part by their structure: straight regions of…

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Research: Biomaterials that mimic bone marrow can alter blood cell development

  Researchers at the University of Illinois report they can alter blood cell development through the use of biomaterials designed to mimic characteristics of the bone marrow.   The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, are a first step toward developing more effective bone marrow treatments for diseases like leukemia and lymphoma.   Blood…

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Questions remain about the benefits of taking testosterone

Graph of results after 12 month treatment with testosterone gel Five new studies say hormone replacement is a mixed bag for aging men As a treatment for the ailments of aging, testosterone’s benefits are hit or miss. For men with low testosterone, the hormone therapy is helpful for some health problems, but not so much…

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Study: Neurotransmitter Dopamine Plays Role in Human Bonding

  “Animal studies have shown the role of dopamine in bonding but this was the first scientific evidence that it is involved in human bonding,” said Northeastern University Professor Lisa Feldman Barrett, corresponding author of the study.   “That suggests that other animal research in this area could be directly applied to humans as well.”…

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Multiple sclerosis: Stem cell transplantation may halt disease progression

  New research provides further evidence of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis, after finding the procedure halted disease progression for 5 years in almost half of patients.   New research reveals that almost half of MS patients treated with AHSCT experienced no disease progression in the subsequent 5…

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New evidence that vitamin D prevents respiratory infections

  A large-scale meta-analysis using more than 10,000 participants concludes that vitamin D supplementation may help to prevent a major cause of global death – acute respiratory tract infections.   Could vitamin D supplementation prevent acute respiratory tract infections? Acute respiratory tract infections are responsible for 10 percent of ambulance and emergency room visits in…

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Ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes have been designed that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don’t elicit scar formation when implanted. These smaller-than-a-capillary-sized probes could provide the reliable brain interface needed to control prosthetics, or follow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. A rendering of the ultra-flexible probe in neural…

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Bacteria ‘sleep’, then rapidly evolve, to survive antibiotic treatments

Biophysicists use quantitative approaches from physics to understand biology The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Using quantitative approaches from physics, biophysicists discovered a surprising way that bacteria can evolve resistance to antibiotics. After evolving a sleeping mechanism, the bacteria can then wake up and evolve resistance 20 times faster than normal — at which point continuing…

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How Common Is Magnesium Deficiency—and Could You Have It?

  Magnesium is an important mineral that aids in energy production, the immune system, heart health, and more. But are you getting enough of it through diet alone?   What to know about magnesium deficiency You may not be as familiar with magnesium as you are with better-known minerals such as iron, calcium, and zinc….

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Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

In vitro fertilization has transformed reproductive medicine and sparked a number of therapeutic and diagnostic breakthroughs.   Now a new, still experimental, technique known as in vitro gametogenesis (IVG) is poised to usher in the next era in reproductive and regenerative medicine. The approach—thus far successful only in mice—allows scientists to create embryos in a…

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Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

  Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.   When conducting clinical trials, researchers collect demographic data on study participants, such as gender, age, height, race and ethnicity. But while most of these traits are phenotypes that can be easily assessed or measured, race…

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Natural Remedies for Fibromyalgia

  Fibromyalgia is a complex disorder that causes pain and fatigue in the muscles. This pain tends to be on specific tender points on the body, including on the neck, shoulders, back, hips, arms, and legs, and occurs when pressure is put on them.   Doctors don’t really know what causes fibromyalgia. People of all…

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Scientists design high precision DNA probes for breast cancer detection

  New Delhi: Scientists from India have designed high precision DNA probes for breast cancer detection and they claim that this can bring down the treatment for cancer ten-folds.   Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology – Guwahati relied on `magic bullets` of science, a class of molecules called aptamers, that can bind to…

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Retroviruses Originated in Ocean 450 Million Years Ago, New Study Says

  Retroviruses (Retroviridae) — a family of viruses that includes pathogens such as HIV, feline leukemia, and several cancer-causing viruses — have an ancient marine origin and originated together with, if not before, their jawed vertebrate hosts nearly 450 million years ago in the Ordovician period, according to a new study published today in the…

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CRISPR gene editing takes on rare immunodeficiency disorder

American Association for the Advancement of Science Researchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells of patients with a rare immunodeficiency disorder; the engineered cells successfully engrafted in mice for up to five months.   Researchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells…

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Year in review: ‘Three-parent baby’ technique raises hope and concern

Safety and ethical questions surround controversial mitochondrial replacement therapy SPINDLE SWAP A boy born in April has DNA from mom and dad, as well as mitochondria from a female donor. To make “three-parent” embryos, the chromosome-containing spindle, shown at the tip of the pipette, is removed from a woman’s egg and inserted into a donor…

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Fertility Preservation for Cancer Patients: Options for Men and Women

  In fertility preservation, reproductive tissues are saved, so that a person may have a child in the future. It usually involves freezing and storing eggs, sperm, or embryos, although other methods may be employed.   Men and women can preserve their fertility if they wish to delay parenthood, or if they are undergoing treatment…

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Freezing As Healing: Inside The Cryotherapy Craze

  The latest rage among celebrities seeking the fountain of youth involves freezing. Cryotherapy began with the use of low temperatures in medicine to eradicate diseased or unwanted tissue, such as moles or skin tags. That’s not what the stars are seeking. Instead, they flock to cryotherapy treatment for its purported ability to burn calories,…

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