Our Sense of Smell Provides a New Way to Battle Spinal Cord Injuries

Researchers from the University of Bristol have just shared the promising results of a new treatment for spinal cord injuries that could help regenerate nerves and potentially improve patients’ quality of life. The new therapy involves the transplantation of cells that have been modified to secrete a molecule that helps to remove scarring caused by spinal cord…

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Exercise changes gut microbial composition independent of diet, team reports

In the first study, scientists transplanted fecal material from exercised and sedentary mice into the colons of sedentary germ-free mice, which had been raised in a sterile facility and had no microbiota of their own. In the second study, the team tracked changes in the composition of gut microbiota in human participants as they transitioned…

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Researchers Say New Species Are Evolving at an Unbelievable Rate

NEW SPECIES IN THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS On a remote island in the Galapagos archipelago, a bird, nicknamed “Big Bird” by researchers, has clued scientists into the incredible possibilities of evolution. In a report published in the journal Science, researchers from Princeton University and Uppsala University have shown how Big Bird emerged as a new species in only two generations….

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AHA’s New Guidelines for High BP Levels

The American Heart Association (AHA) has revised its guideline for high blood pressure from 140/90 to 130/80. This new standard is based largely on the findings of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) study. The trial included data from over 9,000 participants and focused on determining if a BP target of 120 or less…

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For the First Time, a Robot Passed a Medical Licensing Exam

IN BRIEF Chinese AI-powered robot Xiaoyi took the country’s medical licensing examinations and passed, according to local reports. Xiaoyi is just one example of how much China is keen on using AI to make a number of industries more efficient.  ROBOT MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL Experts generally agree that, before we might consider artificial intelligence (AI) to…

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How it works: ​We explain how your fitness tracker measures your daily steps

It sits quietly on your wrist: counting up your steps, tracking your sleep, monitoring your heart and calculating the difference between a light jog and a mad sprint. But how exactly does your fitness tracker come up with all the statistics that appear on the accompanying app? Well, whether you’ve grabbed a new Boltt or maybe something like the Garmin Vivosmart 3,…

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Eat These Foods to Build Resistance Against Effects of Air Pollution

The air we breathe has reached dangerous levels of pollution. People with no known respiratory problems are landing up in hospital emergency rooms. While the government does its bit to improve air quality, we would like to introduce you to some natural antioxidant nutrients that can help your body deal with this onslaught.   Load…

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Calls for Amazon to ban ‘anorexia hoodie’

Amazon has been described as “irresponsible” for selling a hoodie that describes anorexia as “like bulimia, except with self-control”. One woman living with anorexia said it could “damage” the mental health of those with the conditions. Anorexia expert Dr Susie Orbach told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme the online retailer should “remove it immediately”. Amazon…

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U.S. pressing India to avoid capping medical device prices, allow withdrawals

The United States is pressing India not to extend price caps on medical devices and wants New Delhi to allow firms to withdraw products from the market if they do not wish to sell at government determined rates, a U.S. trade official told Reuters. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has in recent months slashed prices of medical…

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This device aims to tackle ventilator-associated pneumonia

Nachiket Deval , a National Institute of Design graduate, had always wanted to make a medical device that would be of use to the masses. He also tried to make one for his thesis project. The natural progression for Deval was to start a company after a few stints in a couple of design and engineering jobs. But…

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Indian Health Industry Profile Update- July 2017

Healthcare has become one of India’s largest sectors both in terms of revenue & employment. The industry is growing at a tremendous pace owing to its strengthening coverage, services and increasing expenditure by public as well private players During 2008-20, the market is expected to record a CAGR of 16.5 per cent The total industry…

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One in five Indians is deficient in Vitamin B12: Metropolis Study

A study by Metropolis Healthcare has found that more than 15 per cent of the Indian population lacks the optimum quantity of vitamin B12, and majority of them are vegetarians. “Growing age makes it difficult to absorb vitamin B12. It also becomes harder if one has had a weight loss surgery or any other surgery…

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Medical camera makes light work of seeing through the body

Scientists have developed a camera that can see through the human body. The camera is designed to help doctors track medical tools known as endoscopes that are used to investigate a range of internal conditions. The new device is able to detect sources of light inside the body, such as the illuminated tip of the endoscope’s long…

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Astronaut urine may be recycled into nutrients, plastic

Scientists have found a way to recycle human urine into food supplements and plastics, an advance that may make long duration space trips more feasible. Astronauts can not take a lot of spare parts into space because every extra ounce adds to the cost of fuel needed to escape the Earth’s gravity. “If astronauts are going to make journeys that span several…

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How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

For the first time, a generation of children is going through adolescence with smartphones ever-present. Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, has a name for these young people born between 1995 and 2012: “iGen.” She says members of this generation are physically safer than those who came before them. They drink…

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Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients

Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, it is typical that one limb loses its ability to function normally — a clinical…

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Man dies from flesh-eating bacteria after swimming with new tattoo

A 31-year-old man died after he reportedly ignored warnings about swimming after getting a new tattoo and contracted a flesh-eating bacteria infection in the Gulf of Mexico. The unidentified man, whose case was detailed in the British Medical Journal, had gotten a tattoo on his right calf five days prior to swimming, Metro reported. The man…

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Domestic med devices hit by cheap imports

The domestic medical devices industry seems to be facing a double whammy .On the one hand, the industry -which offers cardiac stents, electro-cardiograms, ultrasound machines, heart valves and newborn screening kits -is facing an onslaught of low-priced Chinese imports. On the other, it is being beaten by restrictive conditions on “perceived quality“ in government and…

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Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples

A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes – considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that…

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To experience beauty, we need to think

In a recent study, two of Immanuel Kant’s theories on experiencing beauty were assessed. The conclusion is that beauty might be in the eye of the beholder, but the beholder will need to think about it to appreciate it. Beauty is an ephemeral term. Many of us will find beauty in a tropical beach or…

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South African cave yields yet more fossils of a newfound relative

Probing deeper into the South African cave system known as Rising Star, a subterranian maze that last year yielded the largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi. The discovery, announced May 9, 2017 with the publication…

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First public sector stem cell bank to come up at KGMU

In what may come as a relief to over 1 lakh patients of thalassemia in India, a public sector stem cell bank is set to come up at UP’s King George’s Medical University here. A project of the university’s transfusion medicine department, the stem cell bank would roll out stem cell therapy to patients of thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. The proposal is awaiting clearance…

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The exercise pill is here: Burn fat without undergoing fitness training (Video)

For those, who cannot undergo fitness training, ‘exercise pill’ may work as magic for them! A study says, the prospect of an ‘exercise pill’ can be life-changing for people, who don’t work out because of obesity or serious physical disabilities. Hopes for such a pill emerged from scientists who found that an experimental drug allowed mice to run…

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What’s coming next ? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speech

An international collaboration of neuroscientists has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. In the study, publishing on April 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology scientists from Newcastle University, UK, and a neurosurgery group at the University of Iowa, USA, report that they have discovered mechanisms in the…

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Govt cracks whip, no stent can be withdrawn for now

The government has invoked special powers under the law to prohibit stent makers from withdrawing their products from the market for the next six months. Am id reports that several manufacturers, including Abbott and Medtronics, are seeking to withdraw premium, high-priced stents from the Indian market on account of the price cap imposed by National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA), the…

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European biliary and pancreatic stents market to hit $84 million by 2023

The European pancreatic and biliary stents market, which covers 21 major markets, is set to grow from $60.5 million in 2016 to around $84 million by 2023, representing a compound annual growth rate of 4.8%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. The company’s latest report states that key drivers of the market include increased cancer rates and…

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India changes definition of blindness, opts for WHO criteria

India has changed its over four- decade-old definition of blindness, bringing it in line with the WHO criteria, a step that would drastically bring down the number of people considered “blind” in the country. According to the new definition, a person who is unable to count fingers from a distance of three metres would be considered “blind” as…

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