How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

For the first time, a generation of children is going through adolescence with smartphones ever-present. Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, has a name for these young people born between 1995 and 2012: “iGen.” She says members of this generation are physically safer than those who came before them. They drink…

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Soft wearable robotic suit promotes normal walking in stroke patients

Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, it is typical that one limb loses its ability to function normally — a clinical…

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Man dies from flesh-eating bacteria after swimming with new tattoo

A 31-year-old man died after he reportedly ignored warnings about swimming after getting a new tattoo and contracted a flesh-eating bacteria infection in the Gulf of Mexico. The unidentified man, whose case was detailed in the British Medical Journal, had gotten a tattoo on his right calf five days prior to swimming, Metro reported. The man…

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Domestic med devices hit by cheap imports

The domestic medical devices industry seems to be facing a double whammy .On the one hand, the industry -which offers cardiac stents, electro-cardiograms, ultrasound machines, heart valves and newborn screening kits -is facing an onslaught of low-priced Chinese imports. On the other, it is being beaten by restrictive conditions on “perceived quality“ in government and…

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Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples

A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes – considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that…

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To experience beauty, we need to think

In a recent study, two of Immanuel Kant’s theories on experiencing beauty were assessed. The conclusion is that beauty might be in the eye of the beholder, but the beholder will need to think about it to appreciate it. Beauty is an ephemeral term. Many of us will find beauty in a tropical beach or…

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South African cave yields yet more fossils of a newfound relative

Probing deeper into the South African cave system known as Rising Star, a subterranian maze that last year yielded the largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi. The discovery, announced May 9, 2017 with the publication…

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First public sector stem cell bank to come up at KGMU

In what may come as a relief to over 1 lakh patients of thalassemia in India, a public sector stem cell bank is set to come up at UP’s King George’s Medical University here. A project of the university’s transfusion medicine department, the stem cell bank would roll out stem cell therapy to patients of thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. The proposal is awaiting clearance…

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The exercise pill is here: Burn fat without undergoing fitness training (Video)

For those, who cannot undergo fitness training, ‘exercise pill’ may work as magic for them! A study says, the prospect of an ‘exercise pill’ can be life-changing for people, who don’t work out because of obesity or serious physical disabilities. Hopes for such a pill emerged from scientists who found that an experimental drug allowed mice to run…

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What’s coming next ? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speech

An international collaboration of neuroscientists has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. In the study, publishing on April 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology scientists from Newcastle University, UK, and a neurosurgery group at the University of Iowa, USA, report that they have discovered mechanisms in the…

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Govt cracks whip, no stent can be withdrawn for now

The government has invoked special powers under the law to prohibit stent makers from withdrawing their products from the market for the next six months. Am id reports that several manufacturers, including Abbott and Medtronics, are seeking to withdraw premium, high-priced stents from the Indian market on account of the price cap imposed by National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA), the…

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European biliary and pancreatic stents market to hit $84 million by 2023

The European pancreatic and biliary stents market, which covers 21 major markets, is set to grow from $60.5 million in 2016 to around $84 million by 2023, representing a compound annual growth rate of 4.8%, according to research and consulting firm GlobalData. The company’s latest report states that key drivers of the market include increased cancer rates and…

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India changes definition of blindness, opts for WHO criteria

India has changed its over four- decade-old definition of blindness, bringing it in line with the WHO criteria, a step that would drastically bring down the number of people considered “blind” in the country. According to the new definition, a person who is unable to count fingers from a distance of three metres would be considered “blind” as…

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Toyota shows robotic leg brace to help paralyzed people walk

Toyota is introducing a wearable robotic leg brace designed to help partially paralyzed people walk. The Welwalk WW-1000 system is made up of a motorized mechanical frame that fits on a person’s leg from the knee down. The patients can practice walking wearing the robotic device on a special treadmill that can support their weight. Toyota Motor Corp. demonstrated the equipment…

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XTRAC laser treatment for psoriasis: Uses, benefits, risks

  The XTRAC laser is a type of excimer laser that has been used to treat many forms of psoriasis for two decades now. Approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000, XTRAC uses ultraviolet light to reduce the appearance of large patches of psoriasis.   People with psoriasis have long…

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Inflammatory breast cancer: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

  Inflammatory breast cancer is when cancer cells block the lymph vessels in the skin of the breast.   This rare and aggressive type of breast cancer is known as inflammatory breast cancer because the breast typically looks swollen, red, or inflamed.   Inflammatory breast cancer tends to be diagnosed at younger ages than other…

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DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk

  A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.   Two years ago, researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine analyzed data on 31 cancer types, finding that the number of stem cell divisions within a tissue—over a lifetime—could partly explain…

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How insulin and glucagon work to regulate blood sugar levels

  The pancreas secretes insulin and glucagon, both of which play a vital role in regulating blood sugar levels. The two hormones work in balance. If the level of one hormone is outside the ideal range, blood sugar levels may spike or drop. Together, insulin and glucagon help keep conditions inside the body steady. When…

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The ultimate couples workout

Partners who train together stay together, apparently. So here’s how to do it…   It’s a hackneyed saying, but studies insist it’s true: couples who train together, stay together.   For many of us, hitting the gym is a solo pursuit – squeezing in some exercise before or after work.   Some who struggle to…

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Breakthrough: Scientists create mouse embryo

Because stem cells have the ability to transform into many different types of cells during the body’s early development, embryonic stem cell research offers unique insights into how an organism grows from a single cell. For the first time, scientists have now been able to create a mouse embryo entirely artificially. [Stem cell-modelled embryo ]Researchers…

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Bacteria’s amyloids display surprising structure

Protein clumps in S. aureus differ from those in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s   Clusters of a toxic bacterial protein have a surprising structure, differing from similar clumps associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in humans, scientists report in the Feb. 24 Science.   These clusters, called amyloids, are defined in part by their structure: straight regions of…

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Research: Biomaterials that mimic bone marrow can alter blood cell development

  Researchers at the University of Illinois report they can alter blood cell development through the use of biomaterials designed to mimic characteristics of the bone marrow.   The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, are a first step toward developing more effective bone marrow treatments for diseases like leukemia and lymphoma.   Blood…

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Study: Neurotransmitter Dopamine Plays Role in Human Bonding

  “Animal studies have shown the role of dopamine in bonding but this was the first scientific evidence that it is involved in human bonding,” said Northeastern University Professor Lisa Feldman Barrett, corresponding author of the study.   “That suggests that other animal research in this area could be directly applied to humans as well.”…

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Multiple sclerosis: Stem cell transplantation may halt disease progression

  New research provides further evidence of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis, after finding the procedure halted disease progression for 5 years in almost half of patients.   New research reveals that almost half of MS patients treated with AHSCT experienced no disease progression in the subsequent 5…

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WHAT IS HEPATITIS C?

  Hepatitis C is a serious and often-silent liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus. It is one of five main types of hepatitis (the other four are hepatitis A, B, and the less-common D and E). Hepatitis C is transmitted when an infected person’s blood enters a healthy person’s bloodstream, for example, via…

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New evidence that vitamin D prevents respiratory infections

  A large-scale meta-analysis using more than 10,000 participants concludes that vitamin D supplementation may help to prevent a major cause of global death – acute respiratory tract infections.   Could vitamin D supplementation prevent acute respiratory tract infections? Acute respiratory tract infections are responsible for 10 percent of ambulance and emergency room visits in…

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Ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes have been designed that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don’t elicit scar formation when implanted. These smaller-than-a-capillary-sized probes could provide the reliable brain interface needed to control prosthetics, or follow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. A rendering of the ultra-flexible probe in neural…

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Do you have an underactive thyroid?

  Hypothyroidism – or an underactive thyroid – affects one in 70 women and one in 1,000 men according to the NHS. But it can be a tricky disease to diagnose and treat. Dr Michael Mosley, of Trust Me I’m a Doctor, asks if sufferers are slipping through the net.   Someone emailed me the…

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New clinical guideline issued for treating low back pain

Low back pain affects millions of people in the United States, and the condition is one of the most common reasons for people missing work. New guidelines from the American College of Physicians recommend noninvasive ways of treating nonradicular low back pain.   The new treatment recommendations from the American College of Physicians include massage,…

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