Top 5 Retracted Science Studies of 2016

  Publish or perish: That’s the mantra among academics. The pressure on researchers to publish new studies, however, may have turned this saying into “publish and perish,” as more than 650 scientific papers were retracted in 2016, jeopardizing the integrity of scientists, and threatening the public’s trust in their work.   Misconduct accounts for the…

Rate this:

The 13 biggest nutrition discoveries of 2016

  The truth about nutrition is always in flux. One day coffee is a carcinogen, the next it’s a potent antioxidant. Carbs used to be the devil, now (the right kinds) are the staple of a well-balanced diet.   What’s healthy seems to change regularly, and 2016 was no exception, which is why we’re looking…

Rate this:

Patients Treated by Female Docs Have Lower Risk of Death

Older patients who are treated by female doctors after being admitted to a hospital may be slightly less likely to die within a month of their admission than those who are treated by male doctors, according to a new study.   Researchers found that patients who were treated by female doctors had a 4 percent…

Rate this:

Microprotein important for maintaining human cell health discovered

In discovering the important housekeeping role that a previously overlooked tiny protein plays in cells, scientists highlight that although so-called microproteins may be small, they could have a big impact on human biology. nobody interacting with proteins This image of human kidney cells shows NoBody (green), P-body markers (red), cell nuclei (blue), and NoBody interacting…

Rate this:

Skipping Breakfast: The First Step to Obesity?

  We’ve all heard that it’s important to eat a good breakfast in the morning, but do you know why? Ask any parent and they’ll tell you that babies are hungry when they wake up. This happens because nature has wired us to eat relatively soon after waking. Perhaps the most important reason is that…

Rate this:

Embryo Transfers: What You Need to Know

  Transferring a fertilized embryo to a woman’s uterus is an important part of the in vitro fertilization process.   There are some things to expect during the embryo transfer process, as well as some risks and precautions to consider. This article takes a look at how the process works and who can benefit from…

Rate this:

Can Coconut Oil Help Treat Psoriasis?

  Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes a person to develop scaly patches, also known as plaques, on their skin. Psoriasis symptoms can include silvery scales and itchy, red patches.   The patches can appear on many parts of the body, including elbows, knees, scalp, lower back, and face. Some people also develop scaly…

Rate this:

Erythroblastosis Fetalis: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

  Erythroblastosis fetalis, also known as hemolytic anemia, is a serious medical condition that most commonly results from maternal-fetal blood type (Rh factor) incompatibility.   Rh factor is an inherited protein, found on the surface of red blood cells. Not everyone has this protein.   If a person has the protein, they are Rh positive….

Rate this:

8 Herbs and Supplements to Help Treat Depression

Depression isn’t just feeling sad or “blue.” It is a serious mood disorder with symptoms that range from mild to debilitating, and potentially life-threatening.   Depression is a relatively common disorder in that it affects millions of people each year. People of all ages and ethnicities experience depression, including children and adolescents.   Depression does…

Rate this:

MicroRNA may give clue to schizophrenia’s ‘voices’

  Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN, have identified small RNA sequences that help explain the auditory hallucinations experienced by individuals with schizophrenia. The team hopes that the findings might provide a basis for future treatments with reduced side effects. A woman hearing voices] Small sections of non-coding RNA could provide…

Rate this:

New ‘electron gun’ could help enable X-ray movies

  This illustration shows a miniature electron gun driven by terahertz radiation. A UV pulse (blue) back-illuminates the gun photocathode, producing a high-density electron bunch inside the gun. The bunch is immediately accelerated by ultra-intense terahertz pulses to energies approaching 1 kiloelectronvolt. These high-field optically-driven electron guns can be utilized for ultrafast electron diffraction or…

Rate this:

Researchers find drug-resistant bacteria in air samples

Polluted city air has now been identified as a possible means of transmission for resistant bacteria. Researchers in Gothenburg have shown that air samples from Beijing contain DNA from genes that make bacteria resistant to the most powerful antibiotics we have.   “This may be a more important means of transmission than previously thought,” says…

Rate this:

25 AMAZING BENEFITS & USES FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Hydrogen peroxide (3% solution) is the only germicidal agent composed only of water and oxygen. Like ozone, it kills disease organisms by oxidation! Hydrogen peroxide is considered the worlds safest all natural effective sanitizer. It kills microorganisms by oxidizing them, which can be best described as a controlled burning process. When Hydrogen peroxide reacts with…

Rate this:

Why Is My Urine Bright Yellow? Colors Changes and Causes

Normal urine should be a pale yellow color. It should be clear, without cloudiness or particle deposits.   “Why is my urine bright yellow?” is a question that can be answered if the meaning of bright yellow is clear.   This page will explain the full range of possible colors of urine and why they…

Rate this:

MRSA: Causes, Symptoms, Prevention and Treatments

MRSA, (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus), is a form of bacterial infection that is resistant to numerous antibiotics including methicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin and oxacillin, thus making it challenging to treat the infection successfully.1   Often referred to as a superbug, MRSA infection may commence as a minor skin sore, pimple or boil, before becoming serious, potentially harmful…

Rate this:

Somatostatin analogs in pheochromocytoma research:

Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) is a rare type of tumor that develops from neural crest tissue in the central medulla of the adrenal gland. They affect only about 4 in every 106 people each year, but until relatively recently they remained largely undiagnosed1. PHEOs secrete adrenaline and noradrenaline, the hormones that control the…

Rate this:

What is Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a type of heart disease in which the heart muscle in the ventricles becomes thickened without any obvious cause.   This prevents the heart from pumping effectively, and it can cause sudden cardiac death if left untreated.   As the heart muscle, or myocardium, thickens, the muscle cells can also become disorganized….

Rate this:

How Your Ancestry Influences the Inflammation in Your Body

  When ancient humans interbred with Neanderthals, they inherited DNA that may influence modern Europeans’ immune systems to this day, a new study suggests.   The research found that inflammation and other immune responses work differently in Africans than they do in Europeans, in part because Europeans have inherited some of their genetic information from…

Rate this:

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

  Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent…

Rate this:

New, carbon-nanotube tool for ultra-sensitive virus detection, identification

  A new tool that uses a forest-like array of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes that can be finely tuned to selectively trap viruses by their size can increase the detection threshold for viruses and speed the process of identifying newly-emerging viruses.   Scanning electron microscope image (scale bar, 200 nm) of the H5N2 avian influenza virus…

Rate this:

Multiple sclerosis drug could reverse physical symptoms

A drug that treats relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis – a form of multiple sclerosis that accounts for around 85 percent of people with the condition – has been revealed to reverse some of the damage caused by the disease. This revelation may have implications for future therapeutic strategies for people with the neurological disease.   The…

Rate this:

Hay Fever: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatments

Hay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis, is a common condition that shows signs and symptoms similar to a cold with sneezing, congestion, runny nose and sinus pressures. This article is about allergic rhinitis. You can read about non-allergic rhinitis here.   Hay fever is caused by an allergic response to airborne substances, such as…

Rate this:

Supplement Trends: Multivitamin Use Down, Probiotics & Vitamin D Up

About 1 in 2 American adults — or 52 percent of them — takes a dietary supplement, a new study suggests. Although this overall percentage of Americans taking supplements has not changed in recent years, there were changes during the 13-year study period in which supplements people take, the researchers found. For example, there was…

Rate this:

Formaldehyde damages proteins, not just DNA

Human lung fibroblast cells were left alone on the left, exposed to formaldehyde for 1 hour in the middle and 3 hours on the right. The greater amount of green shows greater amounts of protein damage. The capacity of formaldehyde, a chemical frequently used in manufactured goods such as automotive parts and wood products, to…

Rate this:

Basic First Aid: Would You Know What to Do?

Understanding basic first aid can save a life. From choking to abrasions, knowing correct first aid technique is the first step in stopping a situation from becoming potentially deadly.   A new study just published by the British Red Cross and the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom says that over half of all…

Rate this:

Hypertension in children, teens linked to poorer cognitive skills

Children and adolescents who have high blood pressure may be at risk of poorer cognitive skills, finds a new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [A child having her blood pressure measured] High blood pressure may hinder children’s cognitive skills, researchers find. While high blood pressure, or hypertension, is perceived by some people to…

Rate this:

New drug target for asthma, autoimmune disorders identified

  Using a new tool for probing the molecular makeup of cells, researchers have discovered that PD-1 – a marker that already serves as a drug target for some cancers – may also serve as a drug target for asthma and other autoimmune disorders. Autoimmune disease definition, pills, and syringe Using a new tool that…

Rate this:

HPV: How physicians recommend vaccine influences parents’ choices

  Human papillomavirus is currently the most commonly sexually transmitted infection, affecting around 79 million Americans and causing about 38,793 cancers each year. While there is a vaccine to protect against cancers caused by the virus, a new study finds that parents’ willingness to vaccinate their child depends on the language used by their physician…

Rate this: