MRI Scans Of Human Brain Show Impact Of Alcohol And Tobacco

  Results from a brain imaging study at the Imperial College of London have brought us one step closer to comprehending how the of the mind works. In particular, scientists have gained some insight into brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, which required them to scan healthy subjects before they developed symptoms.   The new study…

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Graphene nanoribbons show promise for healing spinal injuries

  The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a newly developed process and a common polymer could someday be of critical importance to healing damaged spinal cords in people, according to scientists.   X-ray of spine (stock image).   The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a process developed at Rice University and a common…

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First results from world’s biggest body scanning project

Data from the first 5,000 UK Biobank participants taking part in the world’s largest health imaging study has been released for health researchers worldwide to use in their own research. Researchers unearthed some rather complicated patterns of correlation. For example, one pattern links brain imaging to intelligence, level of education, and a set of lifestyle…

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A New Sound Therapy Shows Promise in Easing High Blood Pressure and Migraines

  A new sound-based therapy appears to reduce blood pressure and ease migraine symptoms, according to a pair of small studies. The therapy initially reads brain activity through scalp sensors. That activity is then converted into a series of audible tones. The tones are then reflected back to the brain through earbuds in a matter…

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Childhood Cancer Deaths: Brain Cancer Overtakes Leukemia as Top Cause

  Leukemia is no longer the No. 1 cause of cancer deaths in children, but brain cancer has taken it’s place, according to a new report.   All pediatric cancer death rates have been dropping since the mid-1970s, according to the report released today (Sept. 16) from the National Center for Health Statistics. The report…

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Nanorobotic agents designed to travel in the human body to treat cancer

50 years after the release of the film ‘Fantastic Voyage,’ science upstages fiction Fifty years to the day after the film ‘Fantastic Voyage’ was first shown in theaters, researchers are unveiling a unique medical interventional infrastructure devoted to the fight against cancer. Their work enables microscopic nanorobotic agents to be guided through the vascular systems…

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Scientist Discovers A Virus That Could Cure Alzhiemer’s, Parkinson’s, And More

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, and while available treatments can temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and improve quality of life for those suffering from it, they cannot stop the disease from progressing altogether. advertisement – learn more But Israeli scientist Beka Solomon may have made a major breakthrough for Alzheimer’s…

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Embryonic Gene reversing Ageing in Humans

The fountain of youth may reside in an embryonic stem cell gene named Nanog, suggests new research that may lead to treatments for conditions due to reduced bone strength, Alzheimer’s and other age-related disorders.   In a series of experiments at the University at Buffalo in New York, the gene kicked into action dormant cellular…

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Type 2 Diabetes in Teens reduces gray matter in brain

Diabetes Mellitus is a major lifestyle disease affecting millions of people around the world. The risk factors include obesity, stress, physical inactivity, familial causes, race and age. The patients may develop complications like nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, retinopathy, hearing impairment and cognitive impairment. Many studies showed the decline in the different domains of…

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The first human head transplant-Coming Soon

In 2017, Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero attempts to perform the first human head transplant. This follows a series of earlier experiments with animals and human cadavers. In 2015, he announced plans to operate on a live human patient within two years. His goal appeared outlandish at first, but gained some credibility the following year, when…

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Simple Tips for Developing a Positive Attitude

Choose to be happy. Yes, it is a matter of choice. When negative thoughts enter your mind, just refuse to look at them, doing your best to substitute them with happy thoughts Look at the bright side of life. It’s a matter of choice and repeated attempts. Choose to be optimistic. Find reasons to smile…

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No Link Found Between Anesthesia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

A Mayo Clinic study of people who received anesthesia for surgery after age 40 found no association between the anesthesia and development of mild cognitive impairment later in life. Mild cognitive impairment is a stage between the normal cognitive decline of aging and dementia. The findings are published in the February issue of the medical…

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Music Series (Article 02)- How Music Affects Us and Promotes Health

Music improves memory performance   The power of music to affect memory is quite intriguing. Mozart’s music and baroque music, with a 60 beats per minute beat pattern, activates the left and right brain. The simultaneous left and right brain action maximizes learning and retention of information. The information being studied activates the left brain…

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Music Series -How Music Effects Us and Promotes Health?

Music is an art, entertainment, pleasure, and … medicine for the soul and body. Music is one of the few activities that involves using the whole brain. It is intrinsic to all cultures and has surprising benefits not only for learning language, improving memory and focusing attention, but also for physical coordination and development. Not…

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Hidden health benefits of celebrations

The festive season gets bad press when it comes to health — all that booze, fattening food and slumping in front of the gogglebox. But the reality is that celebrations can boost your wellbeing, especially if you were to follow a festive occasion’s must-dos a regular days. You are around loved ones The average family…

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Beware! Junk food may shrink your brain reveals a new study

The part of the brain believed to be integral to learning, memory and mental health is smaller in people who regularly consume unhealthy foods such as sweet drinks, salty snacks and processed meats, new research has found. Although the study was conducted in adults over 60 years of age, the researchers believe that the findings…

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Always remember: Forgetfulness is an early sign of dementia

When 36-year-old Latha could not any more take the embarrassment of daily episodes of forgetfulness — recalling where she kept her money or forgot to pick up children from school — she finally decided to visit a good neurologist. Blamed by her family for being irritable and short tempered at times, she was later diagnosed…

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Therapeutic hypothermia after nonshockable-rhythm cardiac arrest

Therapeutic hypothermia significantly raises the rate of survival with a good neurologic outcome among patients who are comatose after a cardiac arrest with a nonshockable initial rhythm, according to a report published online November 16 in Circulation. Many observational and retrospective cohort studies have examined the possible benefits of therapeutic hypothermia in this patient population,…

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How to kick negative self-talk to the curb

Erica Bartlett has spent most of her adult life saying horrible things to herself. As a heavy teenager, her greatest hits included: “I’m so ugly. No one will ever be attracted to me. I can’t stand to see how big I look in the mirror. I have no willpower around brownies.” DailyBurn: 6 Signs That You’re…

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Indian-origin researcher deveops eye lens that may spell the end of reading glasses

An Indian-origin researcher in the UK is developing an adjustable artificial lens, made from the same material found in smartphone and TV screens, which could improve vision in older people with presbyopia and cataracts. As people age, their lenses lose flexibility and elasticity. This leads to a condition known as presbyopia, common in people over 45 years old,…

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Could brain size predict risk of cognitive impairment?

The research is published in the journal Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy. It focuses specifically on the hippocampi, two “seahorse-looking structures” located in the left and right brain that help form new memories. When these structures are impaired – due to Alzheimer’s disease, for example – it can be difficult to remember things that have happened recently. The…

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Believe it or not! But laziness is wired in us

While you burn calories at the gym or while running in the neighbourhood park, our brain constantly works the opposite, looking for shortest route or choose to sit rather than stand, researchers report. A team from Simon Fraser University in Canada found that our nervous systems are remarkably adept in changing the way we move…

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What your feet say about your health?

Experts say the state of our feet might tell us if we have other serious health problems. They may spend most of the year hidden away under socks, but our feet are, in fact, a window to what’s really happening in our bodies. “We neglect our feet and put up with signs and symptoms that,…

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Air pollution may increase Alzheimer’s risk

Higher levels of air pollution may increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease in those who carry a gene associated with the debilitating brain disorder, suggests new research. The researchers detected detrimental impact of air pollution on cognitive abilities of children carrying a version of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) associated with the risk for Alzheimer disease…

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Extra screen time drags down teenagers’ exam grades, study finds

Teenagers who spend an extra hour a day surfing the internet, watching TV or playing computer games risk performing two grades worse in exams than their peers who don’t, according to research by British scientists. In a study of more than 800 students aged 14 and 15, researchers from Cambridge University also found that physical…

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Indian scientist explains why we shouldn’t drink Coke

In the first 10 minutes, a person consumes around 10 teaspoons of sugar (100 per cent of your recommended daily intake), and though the level of sweetness should make one vomit, the phosphoric acid cuts the flavor allowing one to keep it down. After 20 minutes, the body’s blood sugar spikes giving an insulin burst…

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Emotions influence learning and memory, says study

Emotions are not only the product of information-processing by the brain but they also directly influence the processes of learning and memory, says a study. “Different emotions cause the brain to work differently and on distinct frequencies,” said researcher Shlomo Wagner from University of Haifa in Israel. In the first part of the study, the…

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