Graphene nanoribbons show promise for healing spinal injuries

  The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a newly developed process and a common polymer could someday be of critical importance to healing damaged spinal cords in people, according to scientists.   X-ray of spine (stock image).   The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a process developed at Rice University and a common…

Rate this:

A Quick Fix for Battle Wounds

Nearly half of combat deaths since mid-World War II have been from bleeding out. RevMedx invented XStat to save future soldiers from the same fate. The 1.2-inch-diameter polycarbonate and silicone syringe contains fast-absorbing cellulose sponges coated in a material that helps clot blood. Once injected into a wound, the sponges swell in just 20 seconds…

Rate this:

No Link Found Between Anesthesia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

A Mayo Clinic study of people who received anesthesia for surgery after age 40 found no association between the anesthesia and development of mild cognitive impairment later in life. Mild cognitive impairment is a stage between the normal cognitive decline of aging and dementia. The findings are published in the February issue of the medical…

Rate this:

Therapeutic hypothermia after nonshockable-rhythm cardiac arrest

Therapeutic hypothermia significantly raises the rate of survival with a good neurologic outcome among patients who are comatose after a cardiac arrest with a nonshockable initial rhythm, according to a report published online November 16 in Circulation. Many observational and retrospective cohort studies have examined the possible benefits of therapeutic hypothermia in this patient population,…

Rate this:

Indian-origin researcher deveops eye lens that may spell the end of reading glasses

An Indian-origin researcher in the UK is developing an adjustable artificial lens, made from the same material found in smartphone and TV screens, which could improve vision in older people with presbyopia and cataracts. As people age, their lenses lose flexibility and elasticity. This leads to a condition known as presbyopia, common in people over 45 years old,…

Rate this:

Robotic arms fix deformed spine, help 10-year-old stand

NEW DELHI: A 10-year-old boy from Bihar, who suffered from a collapsed vertebra at the mid-chest level leading to compression of the spinal cord with a large collection of pus in the area, recently underwent robotic surgery at a private hospital. Doctors claim this is the first time a complex spinal deformity has been fixed…

Rate this:

Rare heart surgery performed on baby

A team of doctors at Indiana Hospital and Heart Institute have conducted a rare heart surgery on a month old child that was suffering from a rare chronic disease called Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection/Drainage (TAPVC). The critical surgery on a 30 days old baby is touted to be conducted for the first time in…

Rate this:

One third of total knee replacements in US are ‘inappropriate’

One third of total knee replacements in the US are “inappropriate” when applied to a Spanish patient classification system, according to a study published inArthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology. Figures from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality show that more than 600,000 knee replacements are performed each year…

Rate this:

Laughing gas gets safety OK for operations, Melbourne research shows

LAUGHTER may return to the world’s operating theatres as Melbourne research gives anaesthetists the green light to once more use nitrous oxide on their patients. The anaesthetic, known as laughing gas owing to the ­euphoric effects of inhaling it, had been widely used during childbirth, dentistry, emergency surgery and after heart attacks until the past…

Rate this:

Gene Therapy May Improve Cochlear Implants

Australian researchers are trying a novel way to boost the power of cochlear implants. They used the technology to beam gene therapy into the ears of deaf animals and found the combination improved hearing. The approach reported this week isn’t ready for human testing, but it’s part of growing research into ways to let users…

Rate this:

Bone Marrow Transplant Comes as a Blessing for Many Patients

Bone marrow transplant has over the last few years come as a boon for many suffering from blood diseases like leukemia and thalassemia, which earlier had no cure. Speaking at a press conference here on Tuesday, doctors said since November 2004, they have conducted many successful operations. Blood diseases are either genetic or acquired due…

Rate this:

12 gold bars removed from stomach surgery

Twelve bars of gold have been recovered from the stomach of a businessman in the Indian capital, Delhi, a surgeon treating him has said. Indians traditionally hoard gold in the belief it will bring financial security. Doctors operating on this 63-year-old businessman literally hit a goldmine, finding as many as 12 gold biscuits weighing a…

Rate this:

Appendix lawsuit: Surgeon forgets important step

BRONXVILLE, N.Y., April 11 (UPI) — A Bronxville, N.Y., man had to have surgery twice to remove his appendix because his surgeon allegedly forgot to remove the organ the first time. William McCormack, 43, wasn’t too pleased when he had to return to the hospital a year after his appendectomy to learn his appendix was in fact…

Rate this:

Doctor sues over baby delivery injury

A doctor is suing the Queensland Government for $1.9 million after she injured her shoulder while delivering a baby. Dr Bann Abdullah Ismail, who is only 150cm tall, claims she had to stand on a stool to make the caesarean delivery at Royal Brisbane and Woman’s Hospital in July 2010 because the public hospital operating…

Rate this:

Use Of Bariatric Surgery To Drop Risk of Uterine Cancer

As a world full of dangers and things that can kill you, medical advancements are something everybody can get their spirits up about. If you’re somewhat aware of the cancer situation within females, you’re already aware of the fact that there’s plenty of cancers to claim their lives. From breast and cervical cancer all the…

Rate this:

Doctors remove tumour from baby’s brain

DOCTORS at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumour that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy’s brain. The tumour was found in the four-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that…

Rate this:

Weight Loss Surgery Not Covered By Most Health Insurance Plans

Weight loss surgery is not covered by most health insurance plans and so about 78 millions of Americans are left out wondering how they can afford to follow their doctor’s advice. For those that need weight loss surgery — on the advice of their physicians — things don’t look promising, as the financial cost is almost…

Rate this:

Indian-origin doctor in US implants first leadless pacemaker inside patient’s heart

NEW YORK: An Indian-origin doctor in the US has implanted the first miniature-sized, leadless cardiac pacemaker directly inside a patient’s heart without surgery. The leads-free pacemaker is implanted directly inside the heart during a catheter-guided procedure through the groin via the femoral artery. The device implanted by Vivek Reddy from The Mount Sinai Hospital, resembles…

Rate this:

Shortage of saline causes hospitals, dialysis centers to scramble to manage supply

JIM YOUNG/REUTERS – High demand for intravenous saline, prompted in part by a spike in flu cases in recent weeks, pushes hospitals to find other solutions. A shortage of intravenous saline is causing hospitals and dialysis centers to scramble to manage their supplies of one of the most commonly used drugs. Healthcare providers are asking doctors…

Rate this:

Rare surgery saves newborn girl

HYDERABAD: A baby girl, who was diagnosed with a life threatening congenital heart disease in the womb, got a new lease of life as doctors at a city hospital performed a corrective surgery on her two hours after she was born. Doctors at Care Hospital said the girl was suffering from a rare disorder wherein the oxygen-rich…

Rate this:

Blue Belt Technologies Announces World’s First Surgery Performed with NavioPFS Robotic Surgical System

Blue Belt Technologies, Inc. announced the world’s first clinical use of the NavioPFS(TM) system, a Unicompartmental Knee Replacement (UKR) completed on July 10, 2012 by Professor Johan Bellemans at the University Hospital at Pellenberg, Belgium. The NavioPFS surgical system represents the next generation of precision robotics in the orthopedic operating room, with an initial application…

Rate this:

Global OR market to reach $3.1 billion by 2018

The global market for operating room equipment, such as surgical lights, tables and cameras, could hit $3.1 billion by 2018, according to a new market report teaser.  London-based market research firm GlobalData said in a report published this week that the OR sector would enjoy a compound annual growth rate of 7.4 percent from 2011…

Rate this: