XTRAC laser treatment for psoriasis: Uses, benefits, risks

  The XTRAC laser is a type of excimer laser that has been used to treat many forms of psoriasis for two decades now. Approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000, XTRAC uses ultraviolet light to reduce the appearance of large patches of psoriasis.   People with psoriasis have long…

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Inflammatory breast cancer: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

  Inflammatory breast cancer is when cancer cells block the lymph vessels in the skin of the breast.   This rare and aggressive type of breast cancer is known as inflammatory breast cancer because the breast typically looks swollen, red, or inflamed.   Inflammatory breast cancer tends to be diagnosed at younger ages than other…

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MRIs predict which high-risk babies will develop autism as toddlers

  This first-of-its-kind study used MRIs to image the brains of infants, and then researchers used brain measurements and a computer algorithm to accurately predict autism before symptoms set in   Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in infants with older siblings with autism, researchers from around the country were able to correctly predict 80 percent…

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Aspirin increases pregnancy rate in women with inflammation

Infertility affects a large number of couples and individuals who are trying to conceive. New research suggests that a daily low dose of aspirin may increase chances of conception for women with chronic inflammation.   New research suggests that a low dose of aspirin may help women with inflammation to conceive. Infertility – largely defined…

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Retroviruses Originated in Ocean 450 Million Years Ago, New Study Says

  Retroviruses (Retroviridae) — a family of viruses that includes pathogens such as HIV, feline leukemia, and several cancer-causing viruses — have an ancient marine origin and originated together with, if not before, their jawed vertebrate hosts nearly 450 million years ago in the Ordovician period, according to a new study published today in the…

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New ‘electron gun’ could help enable X-ray movies

  This illustration shows a miniature electron gun driven by terahertz radiation. A UV pulse (blue) back-illuminates the gun photocathode, producing a high-density electron bunch inside the gun. The bunch is immediately accelerated by ultra-intense terahertz pulses to energies approaching 1 kiloelectronvolt. These high-field optically-driven electron guns can be utilized for ultrafast electron diffraction or…

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New, carbon-nanotube tool for ultra-sensitive virus detection, identification

  A new tool that uses a forest-like array of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes that can be finely tuned to selectively trap viruses by their size can increase the detection threshold for viruses and speed the process of identifying newly-emerging viruses.   Scanning electron microscope image (scale bar, 200 nm) of the H5N2 avian influenza virus…

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RESEARCHERS DISCOVER RADIATION TREATMENT LEADS TO INCREASED MALIGNANCY OF CANCER

A study published in the journal Cancer by researchers from the department of Radiation Oncology at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center reports that radiation drives breast cancer cells into greater malignancy(0)(1). Malignancy is a term used to describe the tendency of tumors and their potential to become progressively worse, ultimately resulting in death. They…

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MRI Scans Of Human Brain Show Impact Of Alcohol And Tobacco

  Results from a brain imaging study at the Imperial College of London have brought us one step closer to comprehending how the of the mind works. In particular, scientists have gained some insight into brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, which required them to scan healthy subjects before they developed symptoms.   The new study…

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MIT Biologists Reveal How lncRNA Helps to Control Cell Fate

New research details how biologists from MIT deciphered the structure of one type of long noncoding RNA and used that information to figure out how it interacts with a cellular protein to control the development of heart muscle cells. Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA….

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Graphene nanoribbons show promise for healing spinal injuries

  The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a newly developed process and a common polymer could someday be of critical importance to healing damaged spinal cords in people, according to scientists.   X-ray of spine (stock image).   The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a process developed at Rice University and a common…

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First results from world’s biggest body scanning project

Data from the first 5,000 UK Biobank participants taking part in the world’s largest health imaging study has been released for health researchers worldwide to use in their own research. Researchers unearthed some rather complicated patterns of correlation. For example, one pattern links brain imaging to intelligence, level of education, and a set of lifestyle…

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A New Sound Therapy Shows Promise in Easing High Blood Pressure and Migraines

  A new sound-based therapy appears to reduce blood pressure and ease migraine symptoms, according to a pair of small studies. The therapy initially reads brain activity through scalp sensors. That activity is then converted into a series of audible tones. The tones are then reflected back to the brain through earbuds in a matter…

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Childhood Cancer Deaths: Brain Cancer Overtakes Leukemia as Top Cause

  Leukemia is no longer the No. 1 cause of cancer deaths in children, but brain cancer has taken it’s place, according to a new report.   All pediatric cancer death rates have been dropping since the mid-1970s, according to the report released today (Sept. 16) from the National Center for Health Statistics. The report…

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Nanorobotic agents designed to travel in the human body to treat cancer

50 years after the release of the film ‘Fantastic Voyage,’ science upstages fiction Fifty years to the day after the film ‘Fantastic Voyage’ was first shown in theaters, researchers are unveiling a unique medical interventional infrastructure devoted to the fight against cancer. Their work enables microscopic nanorobotic agents to be guided through the vascular systems…

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Scientist Discovers A Virus That Could Cure Alzhiemer’s, Parkinson’s, And More

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, and while available treatments can temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and improve quality of life for those suffering from it, they cannot stop the disease from progressing altogether. advertisement – learn more But Israeli scientist Beka Solomon may have made a major breakthrough for Alzheimer’s…

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NEW STUDY SHOWS HOW MUSIC BOOSTS THE IMMUNE SYSTEM OF CANCER PATIENTS

Made up of energetic vibrations, music is like language for the soul. It is universal, and can evoke emotion in anyone regardless of nationality, religion, or musical preference.   Music has been present throughout our history, taking a central role in everything from ancient primal rituals to elegant Victorian dinners, all with the same purpose:…

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Therapeutic hypothermia after nonshockable-rhythm cardiac arrest

Therapeutic hypothermia significantly raises the rate of survival with a good neurologic outcome among patients who are comatose after a cardiac arrest with a nonshockable initial rhythm, according to a report published online November 16 in Circulation. Many observational and retrospective cohort studies have examined the possible benefits of therapeutic hypothermia in this patient population,…

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Body part printing masters launched

LESS than 30 years after 3D printers were invented, Australian students will learn how to make human body parts with them. Queensland University of Technology Professor Dietmar Hutmacher launched the world’s first master’s degree in biofabrication, as the technology is known, in Brisbane on Friday. Biofabrication uses 3D printers to make biodegradable intricate plastic scaffolds…

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Seeing babies’ ultrasound ‘magical moment’ for expectant dads

A new study has found that seeing ultrasound images of their babies for the very first time is a “powerful and magical moment” for expectant fathers as it helps them bond with their child.  Tova Walsh, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, said that fathers’ feelings about ultrasound…

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Is 3-D Printing of Human Organs Next?

While science has been reproducing human cells in laboratories by hand to create living body parts for years, recreating full organs has been a challenge due to the complexity of cell structures. 3-D printers could change this due to the technology that allows for precise and complicated replication. This process, known as bioprinting, takes human…

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Study Questions Benefits of Mammograph​y

The Canadian National Breast Screening Study (CNBSS) has released its 25-years-on findings, that annual mammograms given to women in their 40s and 50s find more cancers, but don’t save more lives. This confirms the authors’ original assessment made in 1992. The study has been described by H. Gilbert Welch, MD, of the Institute for Health…

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New X-ray app can be used for testing and training worldwide

A group of medical consultants in Belfast have teamed up with IT specialists to develop a mobile app that can identify where a doctor is going wrong when interpreting X-rays. The app helps medics develop their skills. It also identifies areas of weakness that can be worked on in training and that could potentially save…

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New laser scans for greenhouse gases

Melbourne: Researchers have developed a new type of laser that can be used to detect greenhouses gases in the atmosphere.  The laser will also enable exciting new advances in areas such as breath analysis for disease diagnosis, researchers said.  University of Adelaide researchers said they have been able to produce 25 times more light emission…

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3D bioprinting could spark ethical debate

BANGALORE: The technology of 3D ‘bioprinting’ (the medical application of 3D printing to produce living tissue and organs) is advancing so quickly that it could spark a major ethical debate, says advisory firm Gartner.At the same time, 3D printing of non-living medical devices such as prosthetic limbs, combined with a burgeoning population and insufficient levels of…

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Ultrasound Sharpens Human Sensory Perception

Low-intensity transcranial ultrasound can heighten sensory perception in humans, according to a paper published online January 12 in Nature Neuroscience. In the study, carried out by scientists at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University’s (Virginia Tech; Roanoke, VA) Carilion Research Institute, subjects receiving ultrasound showed significant improvements in their ability to perform on two classic neurological tests,…

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Apollo Hospitals launches tele-radiology services in Chennai

Former President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam with Prathap C. Reddy, chairman, Apollo Hospitals Group, on Monday. Photo: B. Jothi Ramalingam Apollo Hospitals on Monday introduced tele-radiology remote consulting and diagnostic services. The technology will help diagnostic radiology centres transmit images from distant locations to radiologists for a diagnosis. Former President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, who inaugurated the…

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